Sell my diesel car the Motorway way

    84% of Motorway customers get more money*. Get more for your diesel.

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    How to sell your diesel vehicle

    Selling any sort of car – including a diesel – by the usual means can be a time-consuming, stressful, and often an overwhelming experience.

    But now, Motorway has stepped in to transform how you can sell your car – making the whole process quicker, easier, and largely hassle-free.

    • With Motorway, you can get an instant real-time car valuation using our smart technology, simply by providing your car’s reg and mileage.
    • As soon as your car’s profile is created, it will be shared with our UK-wide network of more than 5,000 verified car dealers in a daily online sale.
    • We’ll find your highest offer and you’ll be able to complete a quick, hassle-free sale – often in as little as 24 hours.
    • After the sale, the dealer collects your car direct from your home – for free.
    • The money for your car will be paid quickly – straight into your bank account.
      • Selling vehicles with Motorway is 100% free.
    • And you might get a lot more money than you think for your diesel – our network of dealers compete to give you their best price.

    Why sell your diesel car with Motorway?

    Motorway makes used car sales fair and transparent for everyone – whether it’s a diesel, petrolhybrid or electric, or an SUV, you can sell it the Motorway way:

    • You’ll get a free estimated selling price using Motorway’s smart valuation tech – using the most accurate and up-to-the-minute market data.
    • Dealers compete to give you their best price on our dedicated sales platform.
    • With Motorway, you can avoid all the hassle, uncertainty, and paperwork typical with private selling.
    • The dealer that buys your car will also collect it from your house for free.
    • The money for your car will be paid into your nominated bank account within 24 hours.
    • Motorway is rated ‘Excellent’ on Trustpilot – read our thousands of reviews and see what our customers are saying about us.

    Ready to sell your car?

    Selling your diesel vehicle on Motorway is quick and simple to do on our app or website.

    Create a vehicle profile and more than 5,000 verified dealers from across the UK will compete to give you their best price to buy your car.

    Approve your highest offer, and the winning dealer will collect your car for free and make a fast payment.

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    sell any brand of diesel vehicle

    A dealer for any brand of diesel car

    We can help you find a dealer that will want to buy your diesel car. The dealers in our nationwide network will buy cars from all diesel manufacturers. Including: Mercedes, BMW, Vauxhall, Volvo, Renault, Land Rover, Alfa Romeo, Toyota, Nissan, Ford, Volkswagen, Skoda & more.

    We can help you sell your diesel vehicle today. Our network of dealers buy a wide range of diesel cars of all makes and models from all the top brands.

    get your best price for your diesel vehicle

    Get the best price for your diesel vehicle

    We know that when it comes to selling a car, price is a big factor. Finding a good deal for your car using the traditional methods can be stressful, time-consuming and, ultimately, unrewarding. If you’re selling a diesel car in the inner-city, it can be even more tricky – especially if you’re going around dealerships or negotiating with private buyers. 

    Second-hand diesels offer great fuel efficiency on longer journeys. However, if you live in an urban or suburban area, buyers will be aware that most of their journeys will be short – and so there’s less demand for buying your diesel. This is because the fuel savings won’t be enough to offset the higher purchase price at the pump and the ‘fuel efficiency’ doesn’t really kick in on short journeys.

    Up to 5,000 dealers bidding for your vehicle

    Over 5,000 verified dealers across the UK

    Motorway works with a national network of more than 5,000 verified dealers and – as they are UK-wide – they will be able to get you a great deal by selling your diesel where it will get the best price.

    To sell your diesel car today, start by valuing it on the Motorway website – and we’ll provide you with an instant, real-time valuation based on the latest market data. After you’ve taken some nice photos of your car and created an online profile, your diesel will be ready for sale. Then, all you have to do is sit back, relax, and wait for that best offer to roll in. It’s that simple!

    Rated ‘Excellent’ on Trustpilot with over 50,000 reviews

    Sell my car frequently asked questions

    Common questions about selling diesel cars

    Do diesel cars have a good resale value?

    Around a decade ago, the prices of second-hand diesels fell sharply. However, they have recovered moderately over the course of the last few years. Prices are holding particularly well for larger diesel models – which are still in demand due to their better fuel economy. If you’ve got a bigger, luxury vehicle, you should get a good price when you come to sell.

    However, the recent introduction of London’s ULEZ, and other city-based clean air zones (CAZs) has had a negative impact on resale values – and the rate of depreciation for them is likely to escalate again as the UK approaches the 2030 electric vehicle ‘switchover’, which will ban the sale of all new fossil fuel cars.

    Recent research shows that diesel cars hold around 40% of their value after three years and 30,000 miles. Whereas petrol models retain around 43% under the same conditions.

    What will happen to diesel cars after the 2030 switchover?

    The UK Government announced in February 2020 that it will ban the sale of new fossil-fuel vehicles – including diesels – by 2030

    The decision to bring forward the deadline from 2040 was reportedly made after taking soundings from scientists on the Committee on Climate Change, who suggested that, if the UK were to meet its own decarbonisation goals, then an outright ban on non-electric vehicles and diesels needed to be implemented by 2032 at the latest.

    However, the ban only applies to the sale of new cars. There are no plans to ban diesel cars already on the road. But this does mean that now could be a good time to sell, as diesels are likely to become less desirable as the 2030 cut-off approaches

    What is the best second-hand diesel car to buy?

    The current uncertain economic climate has seen UK drivers make the move to more fuel-efficient cars to weather the oncoming storm of the ‘cost-of-living crisis.’   

    Second-hand diesels offer great fuel efficiency and lower tax rates, making them popular with families who are worried about the cost of running a car as the price of fuel continues to fluctuate.

    The VW Golf, for example, has a very strong resale value due to its fuel-efficient engines and impressive 56.4 miles per gallon. The Ford Focus is another popular choice in the UK, as it is renowned to deliver a smooth drive – even on uneven roads – and achieves 58 mpg. 

    The high-spec BMW 3 Series is a popular diesel on the more prestige side of the market. With its luxury comfort and sleek design, the 3 Series remains desirable with drivers – despite having a relatively low 47.9 mpg. 

    For those drivers that do a lot of motorway miles every year, diesels are more cost-effective – despite a higher initial cost at the pump. This is particularly true of MPVs and SUVs, like the Renault Scenic and Skoda Kodiaq, that have greater torque and are ideal for long-distance journeying, towing, and off-roading.

    Do diesel cars depreciate faster?

    The reason why diesel cars have traditionally been popular is due to their relatively high fuel economy and lower CO2 emissions, particularly over long distances.

    However, if you live in an urban or suburban area, as most people do, journeys will generally be relatively short – and so there’s not enough reasons to recommend buying a diesel. This is because the fuel savings won’t be enough to offset the higher purchase price at the pump and the renowned ‘fuel efficiency’ doesn’t really come into play in stop-start traffic conditions associated with urban living.

    Short journeys are also harmful to the diesel car’s DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter), the screen that prevents some of the nasty pollutants associated with diesel entering the air.

    The recent introduction of London’s ULEZ, and other city-based clean air zones (CAZs) has had a recent negative impact on diesel resale values – and the rate of depreciation for them is likely to speed up as the UK approaches the 2030 electric vehicle ‘switchover’, which will ban the sale of all new fossil fuel cars.

    Recent research shows that, in terms of depreciation, diesel cars hold around 40% of their value after three years and 30,000 miles. Whereas petrol cars retain about 43% under the same conditions. So, whilst diesels do depreciate quicker than petrol cars, the rate is marginal.

    What are the disadvantages of diesel cars?

    The major disadvantage of diesel cars is usually seen as their emissions. Diesels are known to produce harmful pollutants like nitrous oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and carbon monoxide (CO). Whilst it is true that all fossil fuel cars – petrol, hybrids and diesels – emit pollutants, diesels produce a whopping 11.5 times the NOx of other petrol variants. Diesel cars’ DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) can also get clogged by exhaust soot and other debris over time, which can push harmful fumes into the atmosphere.  

    Another downside to diesel car ownership is that they are generally more expensive to buy than petrol cars and less cost-effective at the pump. The higher purchase price of a diesel car also typically makes insurance more expensive – and, not only that, but new diesel cars cost more to tax than their petrol counterparts.

    Diesel cars are usually best suited to drivers that cover over 15,000 miles a year, so if you’re an urban, low-mileage driver you would probably be better off with a petrol, hybrid, or electric alternative. Also, if you’re looking for low upfront – and ongoing – costs, or a vehicle with a low carbon footprint, you should probably look elsewhere.

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